Archive for the ‘NIH grantwriting tips’ Tag

New Webinar: NIH Submission Strategies — Register Now!

You have a cool idea for a research project, now what? The second in my new webinar series addresses NIH Submission Strategies. As a person who works on NIH submissions full time, I know there are certain steps you can take before you write a single word that correlate with better scores and outcomes.

Some of these steps include the following: taking the time to understand the priorities of the stakeholders involved, including reading Appropriations Reports; learning which projects are already in the NIH funding portfolio to ascertain how you might adjust your idea to fit in; identifying multiple ICs (not just an obvious one) and shopping around different versions of your Specific Aims to gauge enthusiasm; building a relationship with the all-important Program Officer, who will help guide questions related to study design, FOA, ESI status, and study section; and understanding the review process and audience before you write.

Your team will invest hundreds of hours in your submission. Why not spend 90 minutes learning some tried-and-true strategies to use before you write that will optimize your chance of success? I probably work on more NIH submissions in a month than you will work on across your entire career. I’ve helped clients land over $200 million in federal funds, and I can help strengthen your submission and improve your grantsmanship as well.

REGISTER FOR ALL 3 WEBINARS AND SAVE!
Bundle with two more webinars and save! Three webinars for $499.

Read about all three webinars, including “Mistakes Commonly Made on NIH Grant Applications” and “How To Write The Specific Aims.”

NIH Submission Strategies

Who: Essential for grantees planning to submit an R01, R21, or R03 in an upcoming cycle, and the senior faculty and administrators who advise them.
When: Wednesday 11 February 2015, 11am-12:30pm EST or
Thursday 19 February 2015, 11am-12:30pm EST
Cost: $199; Or register for all three webinars this month for $499
Takeaways: At the end of this 90-minute session, participants will be able to:

1. Utilize the Reporter website to identify their niche in the funding portfolio
2. Identify likely ICs, POs, and FOAs
3. Write several drafts of their Aims to send to POs
4. Choose the most appropriate IC, FOA, and study section with PO guidance

REGISTER NOW!

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Posted February 5, 2015 by Meg Bouvier in Freelance medical writing, medical grant writing, NIH grantwriting

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New Webinar: “Mistakes Commonly Made on NIH Grant Applications”

In an effort to provide cost-effective training to the broadest group possible, I am launching a series of webinars in the upcoming months. The first of these will be in early February, and the goal will be to help grantees recognize and correct common submission mistakes.

Unlike many who conduct NIH submission training programs, I myself work on NIH submissions full time. I see clients make the same types of mistakes repeatedly– mistakes that are easily avoided.

Each year I am fortunate to have dozens of clients share their Summary Statements with me. Because I regularly read reviewer comments from a multitude of study sections, I can easily identify trends in pink sheets. I also keep track of evolving trends at NIH based on information I find in FOAs, Notices, and Appropriations Testimony. Study sections change, funding priorities evolve. It is important to understand NIH’s priorities right now.

I have helped clients land over $200 million in federal funds in the past five years. Your NIH submission will entail several hundred hours of work by you and others. Why not learn strategies to optimize your success on this and future submissions?

What: Webinar entitled “Mistakes Commonly Made on NIH Grant Applications

Who: Ideal for faculty preparing to submit a K, R21, R03, or R01 in an upcoming cycle, and the senior faculty and administrators who advise them.

When:Wednesday 4 February 2015, 11am-12:30pm EST or
Thursday 12 February 2015, 11am-12:30pm EST
Cost: $149
Takeaways: At the end of this 90-minute session, participants will be able to:
1) Predict some key criticisms reviewers may make
2) Identify problems in their or their colleague’s draft applications
3) Utilize that information to write stronger drafts

NIH Grantwriting Webinar Series Begins in February 2015!

We are happy to announce that in addition to one-on-one consulting, workshops, and seminars, we are now adding webinars to our menu of options to help NIH grantees. Upcoming webinars:

Mistakes Commonly Made On NIH Grant Applications
Benefit from the knowledge gained by a grantwriter who reads dozens of Summary Statements per year.

Wednesday 4 February, 11am-12:30pm EST or Thursday 12 February, 11am-12:30pm EST

NIH Submission Strategies
Take steps to optimize your chance of success before you write.

Wednesday 11 February, 11am-12:30pm EST or Thursday 19 February, 11am-12:30pm EST

How To Write The Specific Aims Of An NIH R01
Learn how to make the most important section of your submission compelling and persuasive.

Wednesday 25 February, 11am-12:30pm EST or Tuesday 3 March, 11am-12:30pm EST

Learn More!

NIH Issues Draft Policy That Would Require A Single IRB For Multi-Site Clinical Trials

For years, grantees have been encouraged to use a shared IRB in multi-site clinical trials as part of shared research networks at NCI, and it appears to increase efficiency without compromising protection. In early December 2014, NIH released a draft policy proposing that multi-site trials in the U.S. be required to use a single IRB. NCI has already conducted an analysis demonstrating that a single IRB decreases time and costs when compared to having individual IRB at each participating clinical site. To read and comment on the draft policy, click here. NIH is eliciting input until January 29, 2015. A commonly used model of joint IRB review is IRBshare, which according to its website “facilitates the sharing of full board approved documents between IRBs, accelerates the initial review process by enabling a temporary reliance between IRBs, and minimizes the need for all sites to conduct a full board review.” See the IRBshare website for details.

Dr. Bouvier Interviewed on Grantsmanship for the Journal Nature

We invite you to read Dr. Bouvier’s comments on grantsmanship in an article in the latest issue of the journal Nature.

The article, entitled, “Impact: Pack a Punch”, discusses the importance of impact in proposed research projects. It included comments from scientists and funding agency administrators from a wide variety of scientific fields in numerous countries. Dr. Bouvier was the only professional grantwriter who participated in the article.

Nature, a prominent international journal published weekly, remains one of the few journals to publish research spanning all of the scientific disciplines. It is one of the most widely cited journals in science worldwide.

Dr. Bouvier provided permission for her information to be translated for their Japanese and Arabic editions.

Posted October 21, 2013 by Meg Bouvier in Biomedical research, Freelance medical writing, medical grant writing, medical policy writing, NIH grantwriting

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Our Client Receives $19 Million NCI Contract Proposal

We would like to congratulate our client on receiving a contract from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to become the Biospecimen Core Resource (BCR) providing biospecimen processing services for The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The contract, which is for $19 million dollars over two years, was the sole award. Dr. Margaret Bouvier served as lead writer on the contract proposal development team at ITECS Innovative Consulting.

The Cancer Genome Atlas is a signature program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The goal of the project is to catalog genetic mutations responsible for cancer using genome sequencing and bioinformatics. Scientists perform cutting-edge genetic testing of tumors from tens of thousands of patients and dozens of different cancers, thereby improving the ability to diagnose, treat, and prevent the disease. The BCR for TCGA  is central to the process of acquiring both tumor and normal tissue samples and their accompanying clinical information from contributing medical and research centers. BCR functions include analyzing all specimens to ensure they meet rigorous quality standards for each tumor type and ensuring that the clinical information for each sample is available. Once the optimal specimens are examined and processed, the BCR distributes the DNA and RNA extracted from the specimens to researchers throughout the national TCGA research network.

The Center for Scientific Review Board Makes Grant Review Suggestions to NIH

The NIH Center for Scientific Review (CSR) publishes Peer Review Notes to inform reviewers, NIH staff, and others interested in news related to grant application review policies, procedures, and plans. The latest issue of Peer Review Notes was sent out last night (they publish three times per year). Here are items that caught my attention:

Dr. Nakamura (new Director of CSR) Lists Some Initial Priorities for CSR:
  • Become more scientific in assessing approaches to improve the efficiency and particularly the quality of NIH peer review.
  • Work hard to understand and address possible disparities in NIH awards.
  • Collaborate with the NIH and scientific communities to identify critical problems, such as the definition of a “new” application, and to develop solutions.
  • Help the public understand the role of NIH peer review in advancing science and health in the United States.

I certainly wanted more clarity on those first three bullets, some of which I found in another article in this issue of Notes, which I have copied below (my comments appear after each numbered suggestion):
CSR’s Council Suggests Five Ways NIH Can Help Applicants CSR’s Advisory Council recently asked NIH to consider five ideas for helping applicants with promising research ideas to stay in the game despite historically low funding rates. Because these ideas deal with trans-NIH policies beyond CSR, Council members asked CSR’s Director to share them with the appropriate NIH officials.

CSR Council Ideas

1. Treat all applications as new and let investigators instead of NIH decide when resubmission is futile. Council members suggested that the resulting reviews would be more independent and simplified since earlier reviews would not be considered. Reviewers might also be more focused on merit because they wouldn’t get sidetracked by considering how investigators responded to previous reviews. Our Council suggested doing a pilot where investigators who opt-in could resubmit any R01 application as many times as they wanted, but they could submit no more than two research project grant applications in any 12 month period. Reviewers would be encouraged to send strong messages about applications that need substantial revision.

          Meg’s comment: I suspect PIs would love to submit an R01 application as many times as they like, though some folks would balk at being limited to two RPGs per 12-month period (I assume they mean any RPG at any IC). Many PIs I know would appreciate a clear message from reviewers about whether they should resubmit. The grant score alone does not always help them decide, as I have seen applications go unscored because the reviewers wanted an entire aim added or taken away, but they were very favorable about the rest of the application (in this instance, clearly the team should resubmit even though the A0 is unscored.)
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2. Encourage more NIH Institutes and Centers (ICs) to allow investigators to respond to their reviews prior to Council consideration so very promising applications that might slip through the system could be identified. Principal investigators (PIs) with “gray zone” applications would be asked to provide a response to their reviews. IC Program staff would submit these comments and applications to their Councils, which provide the second level of peer review.
          Meg’s comment: Again, I can imagine that most PIs would welcome the opportunity to speak persuasively about their project if they score near the funding line, though this strategy adds to the workload for both the PI and PO, which is something NIH has been trying to avoid.
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3. Enhance communications with PIs: Study sections and NIH program staff should do better at communicating to PIs about applications that are unlikely to be successful or, alternatively, are of potential interest.  [See our last PRN newsletter: Make the Best Use of the “Additional Comments to Applicant” Box]
          Meg’s comment: My clients and I spend plenty of time trying to read between the lines of pink sheets to figure out if the reviewers would welcome a resubmission. It can be exceedingly difficult for a PI to read his/her pink sheets, let alone accurately assess the subtleties of the comments. On the one hand, a clear message from the reviewers about resubmission would be welcome. On the other hand, if the PI feels he can address the problems, or feels the review was less-than-fair and s/he would like to wait it out and resubmit to the same study section after there has been some turnover, they should have the opportunity to do so regardless of what the study section said in the pink sheets. Note that this CSR Council recommendation seems to contradict their first recommendation above: “…let investigators instead of NIH decide when resubmission is futile.”
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4. Encourage NIH ICs to take full advantage of the R56 funding mechanism to provide bridge funding to promising investigators. These “High Priority, Short-Term Project Awards” provide 1 year funding for high-priority new or competing renewal R01 applications that score just outside an ICs funding limits.
          Meg’s comment: The little-known R56 funding mechanism is not one for which a PI can apply directly, it is awarded to a PI with a promising application to another grant mechanism. The award is made at the discretion of the Program Officer, which is one of the very many reasons I am a huge advocate of the PI cultivating a relationship with the PO. Note also that I had a client receive an R56 even though his original application was nowhere near the funding line. He had a great relationship with his PO, and the PO believed in him and his work.
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5. Provide longer-term funding for some PIs: For investigators with large and successful programs, NIH should consider offering funding for a longer duration but at a lower overall amount. The savings would be used to fund more applications. Restrictions on participating PIs would be necessary to ensure that the result would be revenue-positive.
          Meg’s comment: This is such a mixed bag I don’t even know where to begin.
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What do you think of the CSR Advisory Board recommendations to NIH?

NIH Will Pilot Anonymous Peer Review of Grant Applications

On December 7, the NIH Office of the Director issued a press release announcing a series of new initiates. The initiatives group under two main themes: workforce development and data & informatics.

I strongly recommend that people read the one-page press release to get a sense of the way NIH will set priorities in terms of its funding portfolios going forward. Look for new funding opportunity announcements and NIH policies addressing the issues laid out in this document in the upcoming months/years. It is also worthwhile to peruse the original recommendations given to the NIH Director by the Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD) last June, from which these initiatives derive.

Within workforce development, topics include the launch of new initiatives to provide mentored support to new researchers, training and standards for mentors, numerous initiatives to promote diversity at all levels, and increased support to grant mechanisms that foster an independent research career, such as the K99/R00. Notably, the following language appears pertaining to peer review:   Promote fairness in peer review through interventions including implicit bias and diversity awareness training for both scientific review officers and members of review panels, and piloting a program that would make grant applications completely anonymous.

Under data and informatics, they list the following:

  • Maximize the value of biomedical data through a new Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) initiative that would create:
    • improved data and software sharing policies, catalogs of research data, and data/metadata standards development to facilitate broader use of biomedical big data
    • analysis methods and software development and dissemination
    • enhanced training for biomedical big data
    • proposed new centers of excellence
  • Launch the NIH InfrastructurePlus adaptive environment to advance high-performance computing, agile hosting and storage approaches, and modernization of the network, among other approaches.

Are Screening Mammographies Reducing The Rate Of Death From Breast Cancer?

An article last week in the New England Journal of Medicine explores the effect of three decades of screening mammography on breast cancer incidence.  The conclusion from the article states:
“Despite substantial increases in the number of cases of early-stage breast cancer detected, screening mammography has only marginally reduced the rate at which women present with advanced cancer. Although it is not certain which women have been affected, the imbalance suggests that there is substantial overdiagnosis, accounting for nearly a third of all newly diagnosed breast cancers, and that screening is having, at best, only a small effect on the rate of death from breast cancer.”

Discussing Your Application’s Review with Your Program Director

NIGMS puts out a nice newsletter with useful articles and information. A recent newsletter contained the below article, which spells out how a Program Officer can help guide your next steps after you receive the Summary Statements on your grant application. I wholeheartedly agree with everything the author suggests. I think Program Officers are a highly under-utilized resource, and I always encourage my grantees to build a strong relationship with their PO.

Discussing Your Application’s Review with Your Program Director – NIGMS Feedback Loop Blog – National Institute of General Medical Sciences.

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