Archive for the ‘NIH grant money’ Tag

New Webinar: NIH Submission Strategies — Register Now!

You have a cool idea for a research project, now what? The second in my new webinar series addresses NIH Submission Strategies. As a person who works on NIH submissions full time, I know there are certain steps you can take before you write a single word that correlate with better scores and outcomes.

Some of these steps include the following: taking the time to understand the priorities of the stakeholders involved, including reading Appropriations Reports; learning which projects are already in the NIH funding portfolio to ascertain how you might adjust your idea to fit in; identifying multiple ICs (not just an obvious one) and shopping around different versions of your Specific Aims to gauge enthusiasm; building a relationship with the all-important Program Officer, who will help guide questions related to study design, FOA, ESI status, and study section; and understanding the review process and audience before you write.

Your team will invest hundreds of hours in your submission. Why not spend 90 minutes learning some tried-and-true strategies to use before you write that will optimize your chance of success? I probably work on more NIH submissions in a month than you will work on across your entire career. I’ve helped clients land over $200 million in federal funds, and I can help strengthen your submission and improve your grantsmanship as well.

REGISTER FOR ALL 3 WEBINARS AND SAVE!
Bundle with two more webinars and save! Three webinars for $499.

Read about all three webinars, including “Mistakes Commonly Made on NIH Grant Applications” and “How To Write The Specific Aims.”

NIH Submission Strategies

Who: Essential for grantees planning to submit an R01, R21, or R03 in an upcoming cycle, and the senior faculty and administrators who advise them.
When: Wednesday 11 February 2015, 11am-12:30pm EST or
Thursday 19 February 2015, 11am-12:30pm EST
Cost: $199; Or register for all three webinars this month for $499
Takeaways: At the end of this 90-minute session, participants will be able to:

1. Utilize the Reporter website to identify their niche in the funding portfolio
2. Identify likely ICs, POs, and FOAs
3. Write several drafts of their Aims to send to POs
4. Choose the most appropriate IC, FOA, and study section with PO guidance

REGISTER NOW!

Posted February 5, 2015 by Meg Bouvier in Freelance medical writing, medical grant writing, NIH grantwriting

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How The Change in Fiscal Year May Affect your NIH Grant

NIGMS puts out a nice blog that often has information that is applicable to NIH grants in general. I subscribe to it and often mine out grantsmanship gems from it. In the latest issue, NIGMS discusses how the change in fiscal year (FY13 is meant to begin on Oct 1, 2012) may affect your funded NIH grant:

How the Change of Fiscal Year Affects Your NIGMS Grant – NIGMS Feedback Loop Blog – National Institute of General Medical Sciences.

Topics include:

*September Council’s over. My application did well in review. When is my grant going to get funded?

*Would my grant application be funded more quickly if it went to a different Council round?

*Why can’t I activate my NRSA fellowship in October or early November?

*I’m moving from one institution to another on October 1. Can my grant or fellowship be transferred when I move? I want it to start on the day that I arrive or, if that’s not possible, later in October.

*I’ve applied for a diversity supplement for an individual who’s arriving on October 25. Will the supplement be available on the day that she arrives?

*My grant’s anniversary date is December 1. Why are the awards late most years?

*Why was my continuation budget reduced? Is the likelihood of a budget cut higher if my grant’s anniversary date is in the winter? Will the cut funds ever be restored?

How Will The FY11 Appropriation Affect NIH Funding?

The NIH has issued a notice stating how the FY11 appropriation will affect funding. The Appropriation Act for FY11 allocates $30.9 billion to NIH, which is nearly 1% less than the amount NIH received in FY10 ($31.2B).  As a result, “Modular and non-modular research grants, from all ICs, with the single exception of NCI, will be reduced to 1 percent below the FY 2010 award level.  Inflationary adjustments for recurring costs on non-competing research grants in FY 2012 and beyond will be set at the 2 percent level, calculated based on the adjusted FY 2011 level.”  The policy does not apply to K awards, SBIR/STTRs, and NRSAs. However, “Awards that have already been made in FY 2011 which are impacted by this policy may be revised.”

As for NCI, research grants will be reduced to 3% below FY10 levels. “Inflationary adjustments for recurring costs on non-competing research grants in FY 2012 and beyond will be set at the 2 percent level, calculated based on the adjusted FY 2011 level.” (Does not apply to Ks, SBIR/STTRs, nor NRSAs.)  Again, awards made in FY11 may be revised based on this policy.

NIH anticipates that its ICs will award 9,050 new and competing Research Project Grants (RPGs). It will be up to each IC to apportion its extramural grant money in accordance with their funding priorities. (Future inflationary adjustments for recurring costs on competing grants will be 2%, and awards made in FY11 may be revised.)

New Investigators submitting R01 equivalent awards will be funded at rates comparable to those for established investigators submitting new R01 equivalent awards. NRSAs will get a 2% increase on stipends.

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