Archive for the ‘biomedical grant writer’ Tag

New Webinar: “Mistakes Commonly Made on NIH Grant Applications”

In an effort to provide cost-effective training to the broadest group possible, I am launching a series of webinars in the upcoming months. The first of these will be in early February, and the goal will be to help grantees recognize and correct common submission mistakes.

Unlike many who conduct NIH submission training programs, I myself work on NIH submissions full time. I see clients make the same types of mistakes repeatedly– mistakes that are easily avoided.

Each year I am fortunate to have dozens of clients share their Summary Statements with me. Because I regularly read reviewer comments from a multitude of study sections, I can easily identify trends in pink sheets. I also keep track of evolving trends at NIH based on information I find in FOAs, Notices, and Appropriations Testimony. Study sections change, funding priorities evolve. It is important to understand NIH’s priorities right now.

I have helped clients land over $200 million in federal funds in the past five years. Your NIH submission will entail several hundred hours of work by you and others. Why not learn strategies to optimize your success on this and future submissions?

What: Webinar entitled “Mistakes Commonly Made on NIH Grant Applications

Who: Ideal for faculty preparing to submit a K, R21, R03, or R01 in an upcoming cycle, and the senior faculty and administrators who advise them.

When:Wednesday 4 February 2015, 11am-12:30pm EST or
Thursday 12 February 2015, 11am-12:30pm EST
Cost: $149
Takeaways: At the end of this 90-minute session, participants will be able to:
1) Predict some key criticisms reviewers may make
2) Identify problems in their or their colleague’s draft applications
3) Utilize that information to write stronger drafts

NIH Grantwriting Webinar Series Begins in February 2015!

We are happy to announce that in addition to one-on-one consulting, workshops, and seminars, we are now adding webinars to our menu of options to help NIH grantees. Upcoming webinars:

Mistakes Commonly Made On NIH Grant Applications
Benefit from the knowledge gained by a grantwriter who reads dozens of Summary Statements per year.

Wednesday 4 February, 11am-12:30pm EST or Thursday 12 February, 11am-12:30pm EST

NIH Submission Strategies
Take steps to optimize your chance of success before you write.

Wednesday 11 February, 11am-12:30pm EST or Thursday 19 February, 11am-12:30pm EST

How To Write The Specific Aims Of An NIH R01
Learn how to make the most important section of your submission compelling and persuasive.

Wednesday 25 February, 11am-12:30pm EST or Tuesday 3 March, 11am-12:30pm EST

Learn More!

Ketamine — A New Drug Treatment For Depression?

Koratmember

Credit: Koratmember at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Remember ketamine, the old veterinary (and sometimes street) drug? Apparently it rapidly and significantly reduces anhedonia in those with treatment-resistant bipolar disorder, according to a new study.

Anhedonia, which is a lack of interest in activities that once gave a person pleasure, is a key feature of treatment-resistant bipolar disorder. According to a recent NIH-funded clinical trial, ketamine restored pleasure-seeking behavior independent of its other antidepressant properties in these patients. What’s more, it did so about 40 minutes after a single infusion, and the effect lasted as long as 14 days.

To me the most interesting part of this study is that ketamine did not act on the midbrain areas typically involved in depressive symptoms. Rather, PET scans on patients in the depressive phase of bipolar disorder showed that after ketamine infusion, there was activity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC). This region lies deep within the brain, resting on the medial surface of the frontal lobes. Its precise role remains somewhat elusive, though it is thought to govern conscious control of goal-directed behavior. The most recent significant study I could find on its function was a 2012 paper in Nature suggesting that the dACC is involved in optimizing behavioral adaptations to continuously evolving demands by predicting the difficulty of a task.

“Our findings help to deconstruct what has traditionally been lumped together as depression,” explained Carlos Zarate, M.D., of NIMH. “We break out a component that responds uniquely to a treatment that works through different brain systems than conventional antidepressants — and link that response to different circuitry than other depression symptoms.”

Imaging studies similar to the one just published are underway in patients with major depression, though results are not yet available. Other studies have suggested that ketamine may be exerting these effects through glutamate and dopamine pathways. Research is underway to explore easier methods of drug delivery, such as nasal spray.

Of late, ketamine has been studied for its rapid antidepressant properties, providing relief within hours rather than the weeks required for traditional medications to work. At present, ketamine is not FDA approved for treatment of depression and it is still used primarily in a veterinary setting.

Ketamine is an NMDA receptor antagonist, though it also inhibits reuptake of dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine. It was developed in 1962 and has been used in both humans and animals. It is categorized as a dissociative agent. It has been used for general anesthesia, sedation, and as a pain killer. Side effects include amnesia and agitation, and its street use has led to hallucinations, delirium, and death.

NIH Awards $31M To Increase Diversity in The Biomedical Research Workforce

Credit: Photokanok at FreeDigitalPhoto.net

Credit: Photokanok at FreeDigitalPhoto.net

In late October, NIH issued a news release stating that it will award $31 million to enhance diversity in the biomedical research workforce in FY14. The award will go to over 50 recipients who will be part of the national Diversity Program Consortium, established to engage researchers from underrepresented backgrounds. Award recipients work at geographically diverse institutions across the country that serve underrepresented communities. Members of the consortium will develop, implement, and evaluate methods for encouraging individuals to pursue careers in biomedical research and remain in this field.

Research shows that economic, social, and cultural factors significantly influence the pursuit of science careers. Dr. Hannah Valentine, NIH chief officer for scientific workforce diversity, asserts, “These awards represent a significant step toward ensuring that NIH’s future biomedical research workforce will reflect the unique perspectives found within the diverse composition of our society.”

The Diversity Program Consortium is part of a five-year plan with three major initiatives. The goal of the first initiative, BUILD, is to explore new approaches to attract students from diverse backgrounds to the biomedical science workforce. The goal of the second initiative, the National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN), is to develop best practices for mentoring individuals from underrepresented groups. Finally, work carried out as part of the Coordination and Evaluation Center is designed to assess the effectiveness of the training and mentoring approaches developed by BUILD and NRMN. It will also establish short- and long-term methods for measuring the effectiveness of both training and mentoring programs.

Scientists Explore Shared Biology In Human, Fly, and Worm Genomes

 

ID-100203689

Credit: rajcreationzs at FreeDigitalPhoto.net

Researchers analyzing human, fly, and worm genomes have found that these species have a number of key genomic processes in common, reflecting a shared ancestry. Three papers were published in the Aug. 28, 2014 issue of Nature offering insights into embryonic development, gene regulation, and other biological processes vital to understanding human biology and disease.

These studies utilized data generated by the model organism ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (modENCODE) and the ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project, both supported by NHGRI. Launched in 2007, the goal of modENCODE is to create a comprehensive catalog of functional elements in the fruit fly and roundworm genomes for use by the research community. Initial catalogs were published in 2010. The ENCODE Project is building a comprehensive catalog of functional elements in the human and mouse genome.

More than a dozen modENCODE Consortium papers have been or will be published in the journals Nature, Genome Research, Genome Biology, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this year. This collection of papers is the culmination of the modENCODE program, for which funding ended in 2012. More than 100 papers using modENCODE data by groups outside of the program have already been published. It is anticipated that the data and resources produced by modENCODE will continue to be used by the broader research community for years to come.

NIH Funding to Study Sex as a Fundamental Variable in Clinical Research

Credit: Photokanok at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Credit: Photokanok at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

I am popping up from my mountain of R01 drafts to bring attention to an important NIH news release. Yesterday, NIH announced it has devoted over $10 million in supplemental funding for 82 grantees to explore sex differences in their clinical and pre-clinical research.

The news release states, “These awards are the latest round of funding in a program described in a May 2014 Nature commentary by [Janine Austin Clayton, M.D., NIH associate director for women’s health research] and NIH Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D. This commentary informed NIH grantees and other stakeholders of the agency’s intent to develop policies that will require applicants to address the influence of sex in the design and analysis of biomedical research with animals and cells.”

The news release states that the goal of the supplements is to serve as “…a catalyst for considering sex as a fundamental variable in research.”

NIH began this program in FY13, initially funding 50 supplements ($4.6 million total.) The initiative has been led by the Office of Research on Women’s Health. Most of the NIH ICs have funded supplements since the inception of the program.

Historically, medical research has been conducted predominantly on white male subjects. NIH has made efforts to expand the scope of clinical research to include both sexes and to represent multiple races and ethnicities. Grantees who want to succeed in the NIH arena would be wise to incorporate such variables into current and future studies.

 

 

Update on the New NIH Biosketch Format

Credit: adamr at  FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Credit: adamr at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

There are changes pending for the NIH biosketch format, and I think it is good news for NIH grantees. The new NIH biosketch format will allow up to five pages for the entire biosketch, as opposed to the current four-page limit. Even better, rather than simply listing publications, the new format will give researchers the opportunity to highlight the magnitude and significance of the scientific advances associated with their discoveries and the specific role they played in those findings.

Grantees will be permitted to describe up to five of their most significant contributions to science, the influence of their contributions on their scientific field, and any subsequent effects of these contributions on the fields of medicine or technology. This will help reviewers better focus on the applicant’s most important contributions to science. Researchers also will be able to include a link to their complete list of publications in SciENcv or My Bibliography.

NIH recently launched a new round of pilot tests (here and here) to make sure the new format will work well for both applicants and reviewers. The pilot will involve surveys of both reviewers and applicants to help NIH fine tune the application instructions and guidance to reviewers. NIH plans to roll out the modified biosketch for all grant applications received for FY 2016 funding and beyond (which generally refers to applications submitted in early 2015).

To learn more about the NIH’s new Biosketch format click *here*

 

Seven-Year, Multi-Center Clinical Trial Award 2014

Credit: terapun at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Credit: Teerapun at FreeDigitalPhotos. net

Meg Bouvier Medical Writing is pleased to announce that our client has been awarded a seven-year Cooperative Agreement from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The team, working at four participating medical centers, will conduct clinical trials to accelerate the discovery of treatments for critically ill patients. The work will be conducted as part of a highly prestigious, multidisciplinary clinical research consortium at NIH. While the size of the award will depend on the clinical protocols chosen, a typical seven-year clinical trial award runs in the tens of millions of dollars. Dr. Bouvier was the lead writer, editor, and advisor on the U01 submission team from Meg Bouvier Medical Writing.

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